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Diving

 

A diver's paradise. The crystal clear water surrounding Maldives offers very good visibility, making Maldives one of the top diving destinations in the world. The presence of rare species as well as commonly found marine life are another major reason for the popularity of Maldives as a diving destination.

 

Diving Season
Generally, January to April are excellent months for diving, with clear weather, low humidity and visibility averaging about 120 feet. In April, during the transition to the south-west monsoon a plankton bloom will often occur on the eastern side of the atolls - this attracts mantas and whale sharks to feed in the channels (though it may reduce visibility down to around 70 feet).

Winds strengthen during May, and the months from June to September have monsoon rains and strong winds.

November sees the transition to the north-east monsoon, with winds moderating and shifting. Plankton blooms can occur, attracting mantas and other big pelagic species to channels on the west side of the atolls.

The temperatures are very consistent all year round, with daily maximums averaging about 30-32°C (85-89°F). Water temperatures range from 26-28°C (78-82°F).

Dive Maps / Dive Sites in the Maldives

Male Atoll Map

Ari Atoll Map

Dive Sites in the North Male Atoll ...

 

Three main types of dive sites

On coral reefs inside the atolls - These are 'house reefs' around resort islands; or steep sided underwater hills called 'thilas' and 'giris', which rise from the bottom of lagoons. Reefs inside Maldivian atolls are notable for the huge number and variety of tropical fish.


A channel between islands on the outer edges of an atoll is called a 'kandu', and funnels water between the lagoon and the open sea. Kandus are ideal for drift dives, and often attract large marine animals that come to feed on the plankton-rich waters flowing out of the lagoons.

 

A reef on the outer edge of an atoll is a 'maa kandu', and usually has less current, greater depth and excellent visibility; whale sharks, mantas and turtles often cruise the outer reef slopes.
     
 
 

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